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EXHIBITIONS

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PHANSI GOES PHEZULU 2016

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2016 BAT Calendar and the book launch, Ukukhulisa celebrates the 22 years since the calendar was first published and distributed to the communities together with the story of how each one came about.

DIRTY LINEN. 25 meters of washing line hung with many sheets imprinted with the pictures of buildings and places especially constructed to keep the black population harnessed. Reimagining the Kitchen suit.

Taking a clue from the above exhibition the fashion department of the Durban university of technology selected the infamous kitchen suit a standard demeaning uniform for black people who worked in urban residences and reinvented it as a high fashion garment that shows its middle finger to those who distributed them to their workers.’

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THE THIN RED LINE. This was the Phansi Collections’ reply to the above two exhibitions. On the other side of that same insulting Red Line stood many of the wearers to whom this outfit was seen as a passport to the city, a place of knowledge, fortune and excitement. It was usually the bravest from home that would be prepared to face this foreign world.

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NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK

Also a Thin Red Line Exhibition,the exhibition centers around Body Art, the fashions, the adornments, the hairstyles and more.

Everything about the people in a little North West corner of Namibia.

Some reach deep into the fashion well of the Wilhelmina Germans who had done the most dreadful things to them – to those from the same Herero language group who insist on making themselves beautiful in their ancient ways and others keep a constant lookout for amazing discards to be formed and adapted to make their own proud statements.

 WIRE AND WOOD EXHIBITION

Closed on Saturday, 24 September 2016

South Africa has a thriving cultural heritage of wire & wood sculpture and art.  This exhibition highlights a selection of  excellent examples of works from the Permanent Collection of the Phansi Museum and items loaned from friends of the Museum.  Sculptors include Philemon Sangweni, Raphael Magwaza, Carl Roberts, Noria Mabasa, Johannes Maswangani, Zamukwake Gumede and and wire work from Thapiwa Musani, Thulani Mchunu, Ntombifuthi Magwaza, Elliot Mkhize and  Zenzulu.

Wire and Wood Invite-

Wire and Wood Exhibition

Wire and Wood Exhibition

LAUNCH OF THE 2017 ART-CRAFT-TRADITION HUMAN RIGHTS MURAL CALENDAR

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One of the most admired contributions the Bartel Arts Trust and the Phansi Museum have made to the enrichment of the cultural life in KwaZulu-Natal is the annual Art • Craft • Tradition calendar.  This annual publication, now in its 22nd year of production will be officially launched on Wednesday, 7 December 2016.  Each year, the Museum distributes 1 000’s of calendars to schools in cities, villages and in faraway rural areas, clinics, libraries, community centres and educational institutions across the province. The 2017 calendar features panels from the 1992 Universal Declaration of Rights and the 1994 Interim Bill of Rights murals painted on the surfaces of the east and south walls surrounding the former Central Prison in Durban.  Both these murals laid the foundations for the 1997 Human Rights Mural of the Final Constitution.  Just as the Rights in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and the Interim Bill of Rights inspired the drafters of the Final Bill of Rights in Chapter 2 of the South African Constitution of 1996, so the works of the artists of the 1992 and 1994 murals came to inspire the artists who painted the 1997 Human Rights mural. Whilst the rest of the world commemorates International Human Rights Day and the 68th anniversary of the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948 on 10 December 2016, the Phansi Museum will celebrate the launch of the Human Rights Mural Calendar of 2017 three days earlier.  The 2017 Human Rights Mural calendar aptly also pays tribute to late Terry-Anne Stevenson, (1950 –  2016) who initiated the Community Mural Projects and who tirelessly mustered the artists in Durban including Thami Jali, Sfiso Ka Mkame, Derick Nxumalo, Zamani Makhanya, Sibusiso Duma, Lalelani Mbhele and Joseph Manana to interpret the Bill of Rights on the prison walls and transform the streets of Durban with paint.

Finally, to coincide with the launch of the calendar and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Phansi Museum in collaboration with Community Mural Projects, the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, University of KwaZulu-Natal and Street Law will launch the Human Rights Art and Essay Competition for learners in Grades 7, 11 and 12.  The objective of this competition is to get learners from as many schools in KwaZulu-Natal who see the calendar to illustrate their vision and understanding of our Human Rights.

Other Roots final

Other Roots:   A pop up exhibition of Indian Textiles 

Thursday, 26 January 2016 – Saturday, 18 February 2017

The Phansi Museum kicks of the year with an intimate Pop Up Exhibition of a selection of handmade embroidered and beaded textiles from Northern India.  This private collection on loan to the Phansi Museum is about roots, who you are and where you come from.  If you are South African you may have Zulu, Nguni, Sotho or Pondo roots, or your roots may reach as far back to Holland or England or a mixture of those roots.  Phansi Museum illustrates that art has its roots in the world of the bantu, the ancient and the transitional.  This exhibition will allow visitors the opportunity of looking at other roots.  Snippets of the magnificent textiles of northern India, like Gujurat, Kush, IIadak, Nepal, Bhutan and Thailand.

Invitation to an exhibition by Dina Cormick at Phansi Museum

New work by local artist Dina Cormick

  “A QUESTION OF BALANCE:  When all around is upside down”

Opening by EWOK 

25 February – 18 March 2017

The public is invited to celebrate the work of well know local sculptor, Dina Cormick.

DINA CORMICK says her initial thinking on the approach to the theme of exhibition all began in a precarious position of uncertainty – to fall or not to fall – both options being equally depressing and gloomy.   Hence, in a crazy world, she elected to explore radical solutions, stretching to the outermost limits of credibility and possibility.  After all, she says, the only truth is the experience of the moment, awakening to a realization that one must risk everything to find equilibrium. As can be seen in examples of her earlier work, Dina has always been fascinated by the interplay between the possible and the impossible in art.  For her she says, the most enthralling and challenging aspect of the creative process is releasing the waiting image, mysteriously concealed within the material and in this case, her chosen medium – wood.  Oftentimes says Dina, an artist has to relinquish preconceived expectations and trust simply in the wondrous exploration of creative imagination. Dina says in her artist’s statement that an important, albeit tortuous, balancing is deciding when to stop working on a piece.   “I am caught between the dilemma of ‘finishing’ to a traditionally accepted degree of completion – waxed, shiny, no scratches or defects or presenting the artwork in the peak, raw moment of [for me] deepest expression – un-waxed, with evidence of the process and the tantalizing possibilities of in completion.”

“Finally, the question of balance referred me to the archetype of the circus clown who puts the ups and downs of ‘life’ into perspective, who helps us laugh at our own idiosyncrasies, essentially to see things differently.”

Born in Nkana, Zambia and schooled in Harare, Zimbabwe, Dina studied art at Rhodes University, Grahamstown and at Durban University of Technology, Durban.   Since 1978 she has worked as free-lance artist from her studio in Durban.  Her commissioned artworks which, include wood sculptures, mosaic and ceramic panels can be found widely distributed throughout Southern Africa in ecumenical church institutions, as well as in numerous grassroots and socio-political organisations.  Her particular concern and interest lies in the didactic importance of art.  In 1992 she graduated cum- laude as a “Mistress” of Feminist Theological Ethics, after critically discussing the manner in which women have been imaged by the Christian Church.

Dina has participated in numerous group exhibitions and solo exhibitions in South Africa and abroad and has contributed to a number of collaborative printmaking portfolios, for example the Images of Human Rights Portfolio, an Artist for Human Rights project.   Dina’s work and her contribution to South African art is widely represented in national publications and in published and critical writings and her artwork graces the covers of numerous journals, magazines, brochures, calendars and posters.

The exhibition will be opened by EWOK on Saturday, 25 February 2017 at 10:00.  Refreshments will be served and entrance is free.

Human Rights Month celebrationsHuman Rights Celebration Exhibition – Celebrating the Art of Jane Makhubele.

23 March – 29 April 2017

 Phansi is proud to present the art of JANE and BILLY MAKHUBELE in tribute of South Africa’s Human Rights celebration, which remains enormously significant in South Africa.  The Phansi has a collection of shawls from the Tsonga- Shangaan people of Limpopo.  These shawls, 1,5 meter by 1 meter in dimension of Indian cloth with the locally preferred design on a dark-blue background is chosen from the local trader and draped over the shoulders in the style of the community.  For special occasions a married woman wears a richly decorated shawl to proudly show off her status, artistic skill, inventiveness and beauty.   The favorite layout seems to be a horizontal panel filled with stories and patterns, bordered above and below by geometric designs and messages recording the name of the wearer, the address, and sometimes including the name of her husband who works far away.  Whatever is important in the wearer’s life at that time is often lovingly illustrated on the shawls.

Authorities believe that the illustration of attire, began with the search of a local identity and slowly developed into great artistic endeavors from the 1950’s and onwards, when men spent many months away on the mines and returned laden with treasures from the urban markets where they gathered treasures and trinkets to bring back to the family at home. There they would embellish the garment to celebrate love, family, home and community. When Billy Makhubele, a well- known wire sculptor from Duiwelskloof in Limpopo at the time, married his second wife Jane, she brought with her a great love of beadwork and craft and soon had the whole family making minceka (shawls) that were sold to the community.

In 1994 the momentous year in South African history their love for Mandela and the peaceful revolution resulted in the invention of a series of minceka that highlighted the iconic events during the first few years of change. Always enthusiastic newspaper readers they cut out the most spectacular events and Jane converted them into shawls of celebration and memory.  The Phansi is fortunate enough to have a few of these on exhibition for the public to enjoy.  When viewing the minceka, it is evident that colour is used to express the pure joy and renewal of life or the momentous occasion.  The red powerful outline of Nelson Mandela for instance is the pumping heart, the blood, the passion, the new life.  Against a black background of reverence that speaks of the respect for the ancestors.  At home in KwaZulu Natal we would refer to the light blue surface as being the colour of the first, i.e. the first-born in the family.   The face is featureless because as tradition dictates, would be an insult to the grand occasion.   The white used in the pieces depicts the bones of those that come before and the gold represents the sun, the treasure of earth.

Jane Makhubele says it all; Her words and colours tumble over each other in outbursts of wishes and dreams.

MAGICAL MSINGA
Magical Msinga Invitation
An exhibition of pencil crayon drawings by Jannie van Heerden, supplemented by work in leather, clay wood and beads from Msinga

Opens Wednesday, 10 May 2017 closes Saturday, 10 June 2017

PHANSI goes Phezulu Gallery will enthrall visitors to the Museum with an exhibition of mesmerizing pencil crayon sketches of the existentialist landscapes of Msinga by JANNIE VAN HEERDEN   Appointed as the Deputy Chief Education Specialist-Visual Arts/Design, for the KZN Education Department in 1988 Jannie spent many a hot dry day in the region of Msinga assisting local artists with the sourcing of buyers, materials and publicizing their incredible artistic gifts by working closely with museums and development agencies. Better known for his oil on canvas paintings, Jannie recently decided to start making his mark on paper with coloured pencils.  He admits to developing a predilection for the medium because of the fine control of the pencil, its precision, the ability to blend heavy and light lines, its potential for opulence and simplicity and how one can build up on colour to achieve a variety of marks and patterns.  The drawings on exhibition illustrate the artists deliberate expressionistic style, the manipulation of the medium and his ability to capture the rugged beauty of the serrated rocks that wrap the landscape amid the uniquely African flora.  Msinga; who can forget the immense contrast of driving from the lush green fields and forests of colonial Greytown into the barren and rocky landscapes of the largely rural area located in the deep gorges of the Tugela and Buffalo Rivers in KwaZulu Natal.     This is the landscape that contain magnificent distorted rocks and land ravaged by drought, Yet, let there be a thunderstorm and within days, the colourful Nguni cows are fat again, the goats are abounding amongst the thorns and the local maidens and matrons are dressed up in their traditional finery to follow the dusty paths to attend celebrations and festivals and dances.

Msinga is a difficult place to live in, yet it is the ancestral place of people who feel that they were never conquered and will never be conquered.  The Mchunu, Thembu, Bomvini and other tribes in the region who have their links to Msinga and those who were departed to other distant homes from the farms in the area and took their styles with them.  Remember the fantastic earplugs worn by the Msinga people.  In Msinga as in many other traditional homes, when things went well one spent money on adorning yourself, your loved one, or the one you were messaging with beautifully beaded love letters – indicating who you are, where you come from, your status, your skills and how up to date you were with the trend of the day.  All this naturally executed according to the generally accepted rules of the community and the demands of the ancestors. Most importantly be humble, show respect and keep order.  This exhibition highlights the beauty and magic of the art from Msinga.

We have underlined Jannie pencil drawings with a simple bead panel which a traditional married woman wears on her cotton apron over her Isidwaba (leather apron). The exhibition illustrates how over time, patterns and colours changed as new materials or new master crafters arrived, for example, the Isishunka pattern being the earliest and most complicated to the Isinyolovane or the Isimodeni patterns.

Also on view area are a selection of artistic masterpieces such as beaded sculptures, beaded dolls, life sized Msinga puppets in traditional regalia and a selection of extremely special aprons worn during the period of childbearing that follow different rules all together.

The exhibition draws on artefacts from the Phansi, the George and Liz Zaloumis, and the Jolles collections to support van Jannie van Heerlen’s work.

Jannie van Heerden will conduct a walkabout of the exhibition on Saturday, 13 May 2017 at Phansi Museum at 10:00.

 ART AND ESSAY COMPETITION

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Phansi Museum Human Rights Mural Calendar and the Art and Essay Competition

19 June – 29 July 2017

 Background to the calendars

One of the most admired contributions the Phansi Museum has made to the enrichment of the cultural life of KwaZulu Natal is the annual Art • Craft • Tradition calendar.  This annual publication is anticipated by many, in South Africa and abroad, in the rural areas and in the city.  2016 saw the 21st year of production of the calendar.   The theme for the year was the Human Rights Mural Wall which paid tribute to TerrryAnne Stevenson.

Art and Essay Competition

At the end of 2016, Paul Mikula had the desire to take the distribution of 1 000’s of calendars to schools further by launching a school’s competition which related to the content of the 2017 Human Rights Calendar.  The organizers hoped that each recipient or viewer of the calendar would be encouraged and inspired to discuss, compare and depict their understanding of certain clauses on paper either in writing or by illustration in any medium.

 Methodology

Organised by Education Officer, Lindiwe Ndiki. Phansi staff members, three field officers, Thami Shandu, (Durban and surrounds) Zamo Gumede (Bergville area) and Innocent Mkhize (Msinga area) and the Albert Luthuli Museum distributed 1 000’s of the calendars and entry forms to schools in KwaZulu Natal.   Phansi staff made personal contact with a total of 443 schools.  Of the 443 schools we received submissions from 80 schools –  a great achievement considering that many of the schools are from deep rural areas.   It was hoped that the learners from the many schools who saw the Phansi Museum Calendar would be similarly inspired by the murals of the UDHR and the Interim Constitution when they participate in a Human Rights Art and Essay Competition.

 The Rules for the Competition

  • Participants had to be from Senior Primary (Grade 7) or Secondary (Grade 11 and Grade 12) grades
  • Only one entry per participant
  • All learners were to work under the guidance of their teachers.

Learners were to answer the following questions:

For all Learners: 

  • Looking at the panels on the wall calendar left to right 1 – 4, 5 – 8, 9 – 12, 13 – 16 and 17 – 20, which Human Rights are depicted in each panel?

For Learners in Grade 7 only: 

  • Prepare an artwork of A3 size indicting what they thought was the most important Human Right/s

For Learners in Grade 11 and Grade 12:

  • Write an essay of no more than 800 words or a poem about their favourite Human Right/s. The work may be illustrated.

Teachers Responsibilities

A significant challenge facing many of our youth today is the understanding and appreciation of our human rights and responsibilities. However, the appreciation of one’s human rights depends on the level of awareness of what these rights are and how to impose them.  To aid this process, all teachers were provided with a Resource Book:  Durban Human Rights Wall compiled by Professor David McQuoid-Mason, which included photographs by Fiona Kirkwood and Sabine Marshall, messages from Judge Albie Sachs, Judge Navi Pillay and Professor McQuoid-Mason and explanations in English and IsiZulu of the 30 clauses of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Participating teachers were expected to impart their knowledge and expertise by way of school lessons or workshop to the participating grades, with the aim of building the participants capacity and empowering them with a stronger understanding of their human rights and issues directly related to them and their communities. Phansi Museum believes that human rights education, has to start with the youth and that it is a critical element in ensuring that the youth are empowered to access the rights to which they are entitled.

As a result of the success and positive response to the competition, it will be referred to as Phase I of similar ongoing competitions and projects which we expect will positively impact on the lives and possibly destinies of young people in those communities who have drawn the short straw in life and history and who for many reasons have not had the opportunity to experience and learn from a visit to our Resource Centre.  We wish to magnify our community involvement and participation with schools and other learning institutions in KwaZulu Natal.    The focus of Phansi has been on schools with particular emphasis on those from rural areas, where there is a real need for the community to value and enjoy and often re-learn and re-appreciate traditional art and craft forms. We want Phansi to be a place where learners can come and experience their culture and themselves and leave feeling good about themselves.

Judges

  • Nise Malange (essays)
  • Fiona Kirkwood (artwork)
  • David McQuoid-Mason (essays)
  • Andries Botha (artwork)
  • The public is invited to vote for their favourite entry from 19 June – 29 July 2017. Only one vote per visitor.

Prizes

  • The teachers responsible for leading the successful learners will receive R2 000.00 per winning submission, of which R1 000.00 is a prize for the teacher and the balance of R1 000.00 is to be spent on any creative venture for the class. The nature of the venture will be decided by the winning class.
  • 3 winning essays will be selected. The authors and artists of the most outstanding and original works will each receive R2 500.00 – provided that they have convincingly answered question 1. Unfortunately, many of the participants failed to answer question 1.  The organisers have decided that in this case, the participant will not be jeopardized, but the responsible teacher will not be eligible for the teachers’ prize.
  • 7 wining artworks will be selected
  • As from Wednesday, 21 June 2017, all the entries will be on view at the Phansi Museum, 500 Esther Roberts Road. Each member of the public will be entitled to vote one vote for their favourite artwork.
  • The votes of the public and the votes of the public will all count towards naming the top 10 entries.
  • The official opening and exhibition of the most inspiring submissions and the winners will be announced on Saturday, 29 July 2017 at 10:00.

Hlengi Dube Solo Exhibition Hear Me Out

Hlengi Dube artist and master crafterInvitation to Hlengi Dube Exhibition Hear Me Out  Saturday, 12 August 2017 at 10:00 – Ends 31 August 2017

Phansi Museum invites the public to the opening of the first solo exhibition of one of Durban’s much loved master crafter’s Hlengiwe Dube on Saturday, 12 August 2017 at 10:00.  Hlengiwe is a celebrated artist and expert on KwaZulu Natal traditional antiquities.   She is an internationally acclaimed expert on Zulu Art and Craft and Traditions, designer of cutting edge beaded jewellery and weaver of Telephone Wire plates and bowl, earrings and jewellery.

Hlengi (as she is fondly called) is dedicated to Zulu traditions and the remarkable artworks that are generated from it.  She has spent the last twenty years working tirelessly in educating and teaching communities about the traditions of her homeland and has single-handedly changed the lives of many black artisans who otherwise would have languished in poverty with their artistic talents wasted.    Hlengi has travelled far and wide visiting rural and urban artists in KwaZulu Natal travelling by bus or taxis in good and bad weather, to fulfil her dream of making sure that artists are receiving the help and training they require.    Not only does Hlengi mentor artists with technical skills she is committed to assisting them with product development and design, pricing, retail and marketing.

This exhibition of telephone wire baskets is titled Hear Me Out and is based on an ancient ritual and rite of passage, ear piercing or Ukuqhumbza, which is a ceremony performed when young Zulu ears where pierced.  Zulu earplugs speak of the coming of age and the opening of ears to the world of the adults.  The baskets are created using hard wire, a technique produced by weaving telephone wire from the inside out, with the wire being wound around the core wire in outward circles. The designs that she has incorporated relate to the geometric shapes of traditional Zulu ear plugs which are no longer being used as readily as they were in the past.

We invite you to visit the Museum, to meet the artists and to see her work and the setting she provided for it.

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Postmodern NDEBELE

“Looking at how the Ndebele Artists exploded into the greatest postmodern artists and architects of our time”

Phansi Museum invites the public to the opening of the Postmodern NDEBELE exhibition on Saturday, 16 September 2017. The exhibition illustrates how Ndebele art exploded into greatest postmodern art and architecture of Southern Africa. Ordinary, everyday people become sculptors, huts become palaces, beaded paintings becomes the expression of individuality. Closes on 30 September 2017

Bahai Durban Exhibition

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